Sunday, October 30, 2005


Apparently, I've hit the big time.

A few weeks ago, I was scouring the Internet Movie Database for my old BYU film friends. Ever since Jared Hess and Jon Heder hit the big time with their little over-quoted, over-loved movie, I was curious to see where all the others were. And then I happened upon this.

If you didn't get my autograph while I was living in Provo, I'm afraid it's too late...

Monday, October 24, 2005

I lost my temper teaching primary yesterday.
I grabbed a particularly rude, disrespectful, and irreverent 10-year old and literally forced him away from the wall he was leaning on. As I did this, I felt a heat welling up in my brain that I haven't felt for years...

I can't help but feel those little turkeys got the best of me...

Tuesday, October 18, 2005

Man, this book is dullsville.

In the spirit of Halloween I've been trying to read creepy stuff.
Earlier in the month, I read through about 25 Edgar Allan Poe short stories and was delighted! Now, I'm reading Henry James' "The Turn of the Screw" and I'm waiting for something to happen...but, even though the main character has "seen" several non-threatening and non-spooky ghosts, the story is more about finding out how really EVIL the children in her care are...gah! If I had wanted that, I would've rented "Children of the Corn" from Blockbuster...sheesh. Anyway, apparently Mr. James dictated this story to a transcriptionist, so reading the story is like listening to Mr. James talk. So the story's language is punctuated, so to speak, with a large, meaning a great sum, of interpolary comments and description making following it, not to put it (even if I should feel uncontrollably inclined to), rather difficult.

The only thing that keeps me reading is to find out why Yale professor William Lyon Phelps called it "the most powerful, the most nerve-shattering ghost story I have ever read....This story made my blood chill, my spine curl, and every individual hair to stand on end." Because, so far the only nerve-shattering aspect of the story is its utter lack of spookiness.


(Illustration by Edward Gorey, who disliked Henry James' stuff, and I quote: "I hate (Henry James) more than anybody else in the world except for Picasso." -Edward Gorey - See more at: http://www.edwardgoreyhouse.org/aesop-updike-edward-goreys-book-cover-art#sthash.YRZHuwZA.dpuf)

Tuesday, October 11, 2005


At BYU you never really see anything written or carved in the bathroom stalls, but, here at the U it's a common practice.
And when I say "common practice," I mean the common practice of one particular guy!
I've compiled some quotes, all in the same handwriting with the same black sharpie marker, obtained from totally different stalls in separate buildings on campus.

1.) "You fake everything."
2.) "Please stop buffing; I have nothing to read."
3.) "Even your failures are mine."
4.) "Where is the best place on campus to drop bombs?"
5.) "I say right here."
6.) "I second that motion" (different marker and handwriting).

Okay, so it's not that impressive of a collection, and it's not that funny, but, it was obtained by visiting two separate bathrooms in two separate buildings and that alone hints at the sheer tenacity of this lone stall-tagging maniac...I mean, there could be more out there. And you guys gotta admit that the image of some self-proclaimed tagging vigilante sharpie-ing something he deems "thought-provoking" on a stall and coming back later to find that noone has responded or, more realistically, that someone has answered back with childish profanity is at least mildy amusing...

Yeah...I don't watch TV anymore.

Friday, October 07, 2005


Emmy award winning scriptwriter for the original Muppet Show, Jerry Juhl, passed away last month.
He was one of the reasons that the show was so great, a real talent behind the scenes type. Frank Oz, in an interview with the Times on Wednesday, described Mr. Juhl's imprint on the Muppet Show.

"He was the person responsible really for the heart of the Muppets. He just knew the characters better than anybody else. He was brilliant because he could be funny but not nasty. He always saw the affection between the characters.
Nobody else could do that kind of writing…. He was the Muppet writer."

Too bad there aren't more persons of influence in Hollywood with Mr. Juhl's entertaining yet pure talent.

Monday, October 03, 2005



Somehow I'd like to be this for Halloween...

What do you wanna be?