Sunday, December 11, 2011

ASHP Midyear: New Orleans 2011

Although I went to New Orleans for a Hospital Pharmacy Conference, I did have plenty of opportunities to explore this amazing city...
 Lower 9th Ward -- Brad Pitt Homes

 Mississippi River
 Jackson Square (AKA Place D'Armes)

 St. Louis Cathedral
 Canal Street
 Architecture on Bourbon Street
 Oldest Pharmacy (Museum) in the United States
 ?
 Near Cafe Du Monde



 The Spotted Cat on Frenchman Street for live New Orleans Old Timey Jazz

The food in New Orleans was fantastic... I wish I could eat like this everyday...
 Beignets at Cafe Du Monde

 Grilled Oysters 
Jambalaya, Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, and Andouille Sausage 

 Oysters Desire (broiled oysters with Parmesan cheese)

 The best--and second--Filet Mignon I've ever had
 
Shrimp Creole may be my new favorite... 

Cajun fried chicken, Jambalaya, and coleslaw 
(not pictured: fried clams, shrimp, crawdads, and oysters appetizer)

Even the grilled shrimp Po'Boy that I got at a food court near the convention center was great!

Sunday, November 20, 2011

We like to watch animated TV shows as a family. Recently, we just finished The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008) and Ali heard Megan singing to herself while playing, "Peter Parker, I really love you."
Gotta teach 'em while they're young, I guess.

Sunday, September 11, 2011



A lobster gets too big for his shell and has to shed it to grow a new one. Sharks try to eat him. The current threatens to slam him into coral. He's so soft, pink, and vulnerable, but he's gotta risk it all to become a bigger, better lobster. This anecdote has always given me perspective in times of trial and learning...about the delicate, deliciousness of lobster.

Saturday, August 06, 2011

Boise, Idaho


Wow, I can't believe it's been over 6 weeks since we've moved to Idaho. We're pretty much settled. We have callings in the ward. And the residency seems to be going pretty well. And Idaho is really great. I think Utahns have a tendency to bash their neighbors to the north, but there are some really cool things about living in Boise.

First, this place has amazing parks. The Boise river runs through downtown and all along it are huge green parks with fountains, rose gardens, museums, the zoo, and trees, trees, trees. There are paths for running and cycling, tons of grass area for Taichi or LARPing, whatever your pleasure. You can fish along the river and some parks have their own stocked ponds. And everyone loves to float the Boise river and get out afterward and hang out for a BBQ along the greenbelt.

Second, Boise is still relatively small, but has all of the amenities of a big city. It has a robust awesome downtown with great restaurants, a huge farmer's market (every Saturday), and various other cultural activities. I guess they've got a pretty good college football team too.

People, for the most part, seem much friendlier than the general population of Salt Lake City. Strangers greet us and engage in conversation all the time at grocery stores or on the street. And not everyone seems to be in such a big hurry on the roads (at least not as badly as in Utah). This isn't always the case, but people don't seem to have such an impending agenda here.

So, it's basically like the Utah of my youth up here, but with more places to eat and shop.

It's funny though, I have met with other residents and people from the south or midwest who think the mountains here are fantastic. I'm sure once you get to the actual mountains they are, you know like in Stanley or McCall (1-2 hours away), but the mountains you can see here in Boise aren't mountains. No sirree. Every day when I ride my bike or scooter to the hospital looking at the foothills in the distance it makes me long for the the beauty and grandeur of the Wasatch Front, the great view from my parents deck in Sandy, and the ability to drive less than 30 minutes to Big Cottonwood Canyon.

I wouldn't say that I'm usually the homesick type, but Ali, the kids, and I are excited to visit home in the next two weeks. Both sets of our folks have come to visit, and it was great to see them up here, but we're excited to visit them now. Boise's great, but home is where our family and mountains are.



Thursday, June 09, 2011

My Sister


If I had to judge a book by it's cover, I'd say this book is gonna be fantastic!

Sunday, June 05, 2011

Church with Megan


Megan's like a screaming Tasmanian Devil at church. It doesn't matter how many times she's taken out or how many bribes or activities or promises we make. She screams, she fights with Lauren, she kicks the pew in front, and she knows she can get away with it if she's loud enough and throws a big enough fit. After the benediction today, the Stake Relief Society President sitting behind us remarked, "you made it!" It's so embarrassing.

And I can't even keep myself going by telling myself that I only need to be able to get through Sacrament because she refuses to go to nursery now that Lauren is in primary. I've tried every trick in the book to get her to stay in nursery too. The sneak away, the push through the open door and then slam it, the treat bribe, but she'll have none of it, she'll only stay if I stay. I can't hold her for 3 hours straight...she's almost as big as Lauren.

I think that's a lot of the problem. She looks older than she really is. I think we expect her to act more like Lauren when she's not even 2 1/2 yet. But, the kid is so headstrong. At least, Lauren didn't scream and fight for her way so hard. I'm frightened for the teenage years and often imagine the fights about curfew and boys that we'll have.

Hopefully the upcoming move will help us start anew. Fingers crossed.

Monday, May 02, 2011

Piano Lessons


Even though I got an early start on piano lessons. I quit when I was 14 years-old. Regrets...

Sunday, April 10, 2011

Sports

I'm not really into sports. I mean, I like to play sports, but I could pretty much care less who wins the Superbowl or any other sporting event. I don't know anyone on those teams, they don't know me. Whether they win or lose has no significant bearing on the course of my life.

Sure, I can see how sports are entertaining for people. Here are athletes doing things with inflatable balls that neither you nor I can do. Do these players deserve $20 million a year to bounce that ball and throw it through a hoop? Do they deserve the obsessive attention (checking ESPN every minute during finals seasons) and blind loyalty that millions of fans give them?

I think that Noam Chomsky, American linguist, philosopher, cognitive scientist, and political activist, presents some thought-provoking views on sports and their role in distracting people from avenues of thought that matter and make a difference, such as politics.
He says, "...in the cultural environment you're a passive observer of usually pretty tawdry stuff; political and social life are out of your range, they're in the hands of the rich folks. So what's left? Well, one thing that's left is sports -- so you put a lot of the intelligence and the thought and the self-confidence into that. And I suppose that's also one of the basic functions it serves in the society in general: it occupies the population, and keeps them from trying to get involved with things that really matter."

I don't think there's a conspiracy to brainwash and enslave the proletariat or the Bourgeoisie into a lifetime of servitude to loving and following spectator sports, but sports are certainly flashier than politics, or other fields that "matter."

I don't know how to talk to people about sports and I feel the need to learn to aid in my relationship-building abilities. When I tell people that we're moving to Boise in a few months, the first thing they say is, "you'll have to become Boise State football fans now." And I think for a minute and finally respond, "uh, yeah, I hear they've got a blue field." Then the conversation sort of ends. So, how do you feign interest in something that you have absolutely none at all?



Tuesday, March 01, 2011

4th Street Sprint Tri

If you've never done a triathlon before and wanna try one, this one's perfect.
Best of all, you've got two months to prepare.

See you there.